A Review of The Black Moon and The Four Swans and Poldark Season Three

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I’m awaiting season four of Poldark but it doesn’t look like we’re not going to get it for a while. In between seasons, I like to read the novels in Winston Graham’s Poldark series that the previous season was based on. Season three was based on the books The Black Moon and The Four Swans.

Following Ross Poldark’s one night stand with his former sweetheart, Elizabeth, he tries to patch things up with his wife, Demelza, but stubborn refusal to admit to his failings and the torch he still inexplicably carries for Elizabeth, now remarried to his sworn enemy George Warleggan, prevent them from fulling reconciling. Ross would much rather go on a foolhardy expedition to rescue his friend Dwight Enys, who is imprisoned in Revolutionary France, and bring his cockfight with George Warleggan to the halls of Cornish power. The arrival of Demelza’s two brothers, Sam and Drake,  brings more trouble to the neighborhood. Free-spirited Drake falls for Elizabeth’s bashful cousin Morwenna, who is promised to a sleazy clergyman. Sam, a Methodist preacher, falls for the less than godly Emma Tregirls.

The titled The Black Moon refers to the natural phenomenon under which Valentine, the child that Elizabeth gives birth to eight months after marrying George and nine months after having sex with Ross, is born. Elizabeth’s baby daddy drama permeates these two books. It also is a bad omen for both Valentine and those around him.

Among those rescued from the French revolutionary prison is a handsome young naval lieutenant named Hugh Armitage, who proceeds to romance the long-suffering and long-neglected Demelza, which makes Ross jealous. When Demelza overhears that Ross and Elizabeth shared a kiss, she starts an affair with Hugh. Ross, being a hypocritical eighteenth-century man and an unselfaware blockhead, wonders who she could do this to him. This was the most controversial moment of season three. Some fans argued that Demelza should have been the “better person” and “two wrongs don’t make a right.” but I was glad that Demelza gave her husband a taste of his own medicine.

The Four Swans refers to the four main women in the series: Demelza (Ross’s long-suffering wife), Elizabeth (his lost love), Caroline (Dwight Enys’s wife), and Morwenna ( Drake’s lost love). Demelza struggles with her love for Ross but is seduced by the more romantic and emotionally attentive Hugh. Elizabeth tries to hide the true paternity of her son Valentine. Caroline stumbles in her marriage to the Dwight, who is suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Morwenna is who is married off to the repulsive Reverend Osborne Whitworth but continues to pine for Drake.

I enjoyed the books and can’t wait until Poldark season four.

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JR Reviews: 13 Reasons Why

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Recently, I finally sat down to watch the Netflix series that Jasmine hasn’t been able to shut up about for the past year. Like with Hannah Baker’s tapes, she passed the series and the audiobook of the novel its based on down to me.

HERE IS OUR REVIEW VIDEO 

HERE IS THE TRAILER FOR SEASON TWO

HERE’S THE LINK TO TO THE THIRTEEN REASONS WHY WEBSITE 

JR Review: The Duchess

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I tried out this Netflix staple of mine on Jasmine. The Duchess tells the true story of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, 18th Century aristocrat, fashion icon, and tabloid fodder. It a completely conventional and serviceable period drama if a bit dull at some points.  Georgiana’s unhappy marriage to the Duke, their strange menage-a-trois with her best friend Bess Foster, and her affair with future prime minister Charles Grey should make this movie more interesting than it is but its beautiful costumes make it worth a watch.

HERE’S THE LINK TO OUR REVIEW VIDEO 

A Review of Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley

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One of my favorite people on the planet is the historian, author, and television presenter, Lucy Worsley. I discovered her through the documentaries she has made and I always get excited when I hear that a new one is coming out, especially when the latest one was a tie in film for her latest book Jane Austen at Home.  In her documentaries, Worsley has outed herself as a Jane Austen fangirl. Austen is the poster girl for the Regency era and her books are synonymous with the era. In Jane Austen at Home, Austen is presented as a woman both ahead of her time and of her time. The stories she wrote reflected both her own life and the time period she lived in.  

The biggest paradox of Jane Austen’s life is that this godmother of romance novelists famously died an old maid. We have an image of her handed down to us of a prim spinster but Worsley’s biography tells us that she had a number of opportunities to marry. If Jane had married, the demands of running a household and raising a family may have prevented her from writing. Worsley’s argument is that Jane, independent and introverted, likely never had a serious inclination towards marriage. She was happiest when she was left alone to write, which is something I can relate to.

Worsley infectious enthusiasm for her subjects, which is evident in her documentaries, extends towards her writing. I have a difficulty reading nonfiction prose, finding it dry and boring, but as well as being a terrific television presence is also a great writer. Jane Austen at Home is a must read for those interested in the Regency period and for Jane fans in general.

A Review of The Lost Hero and The Son of Neptune

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***WARNING: SPOILERS***

Rick Riordan begins Heroes of Olympus, the sequel/spin-off series to his bestselling Percy Jackson and the Olympians series, in a way which reminds me of the opening number of the musical Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812: with a sense of outside dread and the absence of the character who would typically be the hero “There’s a war going on somewhere out there, and Andrei isn’t here.”  One could easily replace Andrei Bolkonsky with Percy Jackson, who has been missing for several days prior to the beginning of  The Lost Hero. Back at home, a beautiful young girl waits for our hero to return: “Natasha (Annabeth) is young, she loves Andrei (Percy) with all her heart. While Andrei’s is away fighting in the Napoleonic Wars, Percy’s disappearance may have something to do with the reawakening of the primordial goddess Gaia, whose army of giants poses an even greater threat than Kronos and his Titans.

Into this this hot, mythological mess step three new half-bloods: wise-cracking and machine savvy Leo Valdez, son of Hephaestus,  rebellious and feisty Piper McLean, daughter of Aphrodite, and the mysterious Jason Grace, son of Jupiter, who must battle rogue wind spirits, cyclopses, and giants to rescue Piper’s father and the goddess, Hera, who have been captured by Gaia’s forces and discover how they fit into the Prophecy of the Seven:

“Seven half-bloods shall answer the call,

To storm or fire the world must fall,

An oath to keep with a final breath,

And foes bear arms to the Doors of Death.”

Among the new characters introduced in this book, Leo stands out as a favorite. He is described as a short, scrawny, elvin latino with a huge personality who uses his wisecracks as a way of hiding how he feels like a third wheel who never belongs anywhere. As someone who’s insecurity tells them that people find them annoying and grating, Leo was the most relatable character. Leo is a rare child of Hephaestus with fire powers: “Anatole (Leo) is hot”, which caused his mother’s death when he was little, leading to him being passed from foster home to foster home throughout his childhood. His fire powers make him potentially destructive since the last Hephaestus child born with them was the guy that started the great fire of London. Leo’s chapters are a lot of fun because of his jokes and his backstory and inner struggle make him the most sympathetic of the three main characters.

The character of Piper brings up a number of issues that I have with the book. I get the sense that at Camp-Half Blood, the Aphrodite Cabin is looked down upon. They are mostly concerned with matchmaking and makeovers rather than quests and monster fighting and are seen as shallow and frivolous at best and stuck-up and bitchy at worst. Piper is tomboyish, rejects the trappings of femininity and her movie star father’s wealth, and is the token girl in the questing trio. Therefore she is a rare “good” Aphrodite daughter: “Sonya (Piper) is good.” With Piper, who doesn’t care much about her appearance but is still stunningly beautiful (if only we all could be that lucky) and doesn’t fit the stereotype of a makeup and couture wearing, boy-crazy Aphrodite daughter, Riordan is trying to do the “you’re beautiful without makeup”/ “you don’t have to be what’s expected of you” moral that is common in YA fiction but it’s highly unlikely that he would write about a daughter of Ares who wants to do beauty pageants or a daughter of Hephaestus who wants to be a dancer since traditionally feminine things are silly and degrading while traditionally masculine things are important and empowering. In the book’s defense, the negative traits associated with the Aphrodite children are mostly concentrated in the form of Drew Tanaka, the hyper-girly alpha bitch who is Piper’s antagonistic head counselor and  rival for Jason’s affection (“Hélène (Drew) is a slut) while the other residents of the Aphrodite Cabin are friendly towards Piper. And in the last series we had Silena Beauregard, who was girly and romantic but also kind, selfless, and a good enough fighter to get mistaken for her friend Clarisse La Rue, daughter of Ares and one of Camp Half-Blood’s fiercest warriors. I don’t hate or even dislike Piper but her characterization suffers from being defined more by what she is not (not a typical Aphrodite daughter/ not a typical child of a movie star) rather than what she is.

One interesting thing about Piper is that she is of Cherokee descent and the reader gets to learn about a mythology other than the Greco-Roman one most would be familiar with and which is the basis for both  Percy Jackson and the Olympians and Heroes of Olympus.

Jason arrives at Camp Half-Blood with no memory of who is he is or where he came from: “and what about Pierre (Jason)?”. He is revealed to be the brother of Thalia Grace, whose mother mated with the king of the Gods in both his Greek (Zeus) and Roman (Jupiter) forms with Thalia and Jason being the result. Jason being sired by the Jupiter form explains why he knows the Gods by their Roman names and understands Latin rather than Greek. Of the three main characters, Jason is the least interesting but he and Leo serve as excellent foils to one another. Jason is handsome, strong, and very attractive to girls while Leo is short, scrawny, and has terrible luck with his crushes. People find Leo annoying and he fears that he is little more than the sidekick/comic relief in the story while Jason is a natural leader and the story’s designated hero. Being noble and heroic, Jason has few other flaws besides the typical stress and uncertainty which a designated hero goes through.

At the end of The Lost Hero, we learn of another camp near San Francisco called Camp Jupiter which is from Roman demigods and is where Jason came from. The Greeks and Romans have an East Coast-West Coast beef with each other going back centuries. Camp Jupiter is where an amnesiac Percy finds himself at the opening of The Son of Neptune.  There he befriends the awkward but noble Frank Zhang (pronounced Jong), son of Mars, and the sweet but troubled Hazel Levesque, daughter of Pluto. Because he is a greek, the leaders of Camp Half-Blood, the fierce and beautiful Reyna and the sniveling and manipulative Octavian, are suspicious of him but send him along with Frank and Hazel on a question to find Thanos, the god of death, in the “land beyond the gods” (Alaska) and battle Gaia’s army of giants.

The difference between Camp Half-Blood and Camp Jupiter is that Camp Half-Blood is more like a summer camp, albeit one where you train to fight monsters, whereas Camp Jupiter is more militaristic with a strict hierarchy and different cohorts. Camp Jupiter is part of New Rome, a beautiful city for Roman demigods where Percy dreams of living with Annabeth (the only name from his past that he remembers.)

Frank and Hazel have some of the most interesting backstories among the new characters. Hazel is a black girl from New Orleans who, like her half-brother Nico Di Angelo, grew up in the 1940s. She died when she was thirteen and was brought back to life due to the disappearance of Thanos. Frank is Chinese, from Canada, and is not only a son of Mars but a descendant of Neptune. They are much more compelling characters than Piper, I’m a rich girl with daddy issues, McLean and Jason, golden boy, grace.

Heroes of Olympus is getting off to a great start. I’m looking forward to reading the rest of the books.

 

J.A.R Reviews: Tulip Fever Review

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I started a Youtube series called J.A.R reviews where my friends Jasmine, Ashley, and I talk about the movies we watch together. My choice for our first video was Tulip Fever (2017) which was recently added to Netflixs.

Tulip Fever is set in 1630s Amsterdam during the “Tulip Mania,” when tulips, then an exotic novelty, caused the first recorded speculative bubble. Sophia (Alicia Viksander) a young woman married to a wealthy and much older merchant (Christophe Waltz) begins a risky affair with Jan (Dane Dehann) a painter hired to do her portrait. Meanwhile, Maria (Holliday Granger), Sophia’s servant, becomes pregnant and is separated from her lover. Sophia and Maria plot to pass off Maria’s baby as Sophia’s and Sophia and Jan speculate on the tulip marker in order to get money so they can run away together.

I am a huge fan of the art and aesthetics of 17th Century Holland and the production design of the movie looks straight out of the paintings of artists like Vermeer. It’s a beautiful looking film and its a shame it tells a love story I couldn’t bring myself to care about.

Here is the link to our review video